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THE PUTTER

As the modern world has moved toward machine-made goods, Ernest Wright & Sons of Sheffield (1902) is one of the last remaining hand manufacturer of scissors. This film documents ‘Putter’ Cliff Denton who is a ‘putter togetherer of scissors.’ Filmmaker Shaun Bloodworth captures the story of how these household tools are put together and perfected in this beautiful, wordless short which went viral in the US creating orders and saving the manufacturer from closing its doors.

LEGO TECHNIC BUGATTI

A full-size replica of the 1,500-horsepower supercar from Bugatti with only the wheels, tires and front badge not being made from Lego pieces. All functional parts including lights, speedometer, brakes and rising rear wing use actual Lego Technic parts. Lego reports that all significant structural and load-bearing parts of this model are fully made from Technic parts without any reinforcements or gluing of parts.

This Lego build consists of over 1 million pieces in total, weighs in at about 3,300 pounds and took over 13,000 work hours to finish. At an average of 10 cents a piece, and looking at the scale model kit of the Bugatti Chiron would make the build price just north of $100,000 USD; one tenth the cost of a real Chiron.

GREAT GARDENS: SUNNYLAND

Sunnylands cacti desert oasis is an extension of the historic estate of American publisher and diplomat Walter Annenberg and his wife, businesswoman Leonore Annenberg. The philanthropic Annenbergs used the estate as their California winter retreat from the late ’60s, where they hosted guests including Queen Elizabeth II, Richard Nixon, Frank Sinatra and Truman Capote. The trust in their name ensures the gardens—commissioned by Mrs Annenberg before her death in 2009—are accessible to all.

LUNCH ATOP A SKYSCRAPER

The sight of 11 Rockefeller Center construction workers casually eating lunch across a beam hanging 850 feet in the air was a hopeful look at life in the ’30s. It showed the world that New York City—and America as a whole—was still building, still progressing, and most importantly still working.

The Great Depression inspired some of the most memorable photographs of the 20th century by perfectly capturing the heartache and suffering of a nation out of work. Images of breadlines, derelict housing, and desperate mothers informed the cultural consciousness by bringing the Depression to newsstands across the United States. This iconic photograph was different.